Page 20: of Maritime Reporter Magazine (December 2002)

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IZAR Fene Shipyard facilities include modern and automatized workshops and paved yard areas, with piers, stores, drydocks, building berths, and mobile and locomotive cranes. An outstanding 800 ton gantry crane spans over both the construction berths and the assembling/pre-erection area and may perform on-board outfitting operations.

Norwegian energy group Statoil to build a barge to accommodate process- ing equipment for gas liquefaction. To be delivered by the IZAR Fene Ship- yard, the floating plant will convert natural gas derived from the Snohvit field into LNG and is expected to han- dle about 70 cargo shipments every year. The challenges associated with the project are intensified by the planned location of the unit in the harsh environs of the Barents Sea, near

Melkoya Island off northern Norway.

Kyoto Tanker

As well as its contract for one of the new breed of deepsea LNG carriers from IZAR, progressive Norwegian operator Knutsen OAS Shipping has acted on the perceived potential for an exceptionally small LNG tanker intended to boost the coastal gas supply infrastructure. The vessel is distin- guished not only by its modest cargo containment volume of 1,100-cu. m., but also by its planned installation of a bi-fuel powering plant to permit opera- tion mainly on LNG in the form of cargo boil-off, with diesel oil as back- up.

Because of the environmental attrib- utes of its propulsion arrangements, the newbuild is dubbed the 'Kyoto Tanker'.

Four gensets will provide energy to the 900-kW frequency-controlled electric motors serving two azimuth propulsion thrusters. During normal service condi- tions, it is anticipated that cargo boil- off will be sufficient for propulsion needs, engaging the two 900 kW gensets driven by gas engines. Back-up and booster capacity will be available through a second pair of gensets of 640-kW output, using diesel prime movers.

The coastal LNG tanker newbuild building industry in the Netherlands' northernmost provinces, the origin of many of the coaster and shortsea class- es at work with the Dutch, German and other fleets, and a source of innovative design and production in the under- 20,000-dwt vessel size category as a whole. Construction has been entrusted to Scheepswerf Bijlsma, a shareholder in the Groningen-based sales, market- ing and design engineering firm Cono- ship International.

Knutsen's move to invest in a small ship able to work into a multitude of potential discharge points with limited space and limited storage capacity along Norway's fjord-indented,

Atlantic fringe is an important step in the development of supply network for

LNG marine bunker fuel. With a mod- ern, gas-electric fjord shuttle ferry already running exclusively on Norwe- gian-derived LNG and unfolding pro- jects for other ferries and also offshore support vessels running on 'clean' gas fuel, the industry has demonstrated its willingness to break new ground in usage of more environmentally-com- patible fuel under the right economic and logistic circumstances.

The coming year will see the debut of a pair of 4,000-gt supply vessels equipped with dual-fuel engines dri- ving the main generating sets in a diesel-electric system. Booked from

Kleven Verft by Norwegian owners

Eidesvik and Simon Mokster Shipping, the support ships will be operated from the Coast Center Base near Bergen under charter to Statoil, and will run on

LNG with facility for switchover to diesel oil should occasion demand. Sta- toil reckons that the use of LNG will cut oxides of nitrogen (NOx) exhaust emissions by 85-percent compared with a conventional diesel-burning plant. contract has provided a filip to the ship

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