Utility Air Cushion Vehi

  • The Navy has received its first advanced development air cushion vehicle, the JEFF(B), at the Naval Coastal Systems Center, Panama City, Fla.

    Designed and constructed by Bell Aerospace Textron, the JEFF(B) is ready for a period of intense Navy testing. A complete checkout and shakedown of all systems has already been conducted.

    The craft has a design gross weight of 325,000 pounds and has achieved speeds of more than 50 knots in the Gulf of Mexico test range. In addition, it has demonstrated ability to operate with two of its six engines shut down.

    With a 50-knot over-water speed, coupled with the ability to proceed beyond the water's edge to offload a 60-ton payload of tanks and heavy artillery inland, the JEFF Craft will pave the way for adding an essential new dimension to Navy/Marine Corps amphibious assault capability.

    This flexibility can be translated into tactical surprise, increased survivability and a rapid buildup of forces ashore by the amphibious forces of the future.

    The JEFF Craft are the largest (in terms of design weight) military hovercraft in the world. They stand at the perimeter of known technology for ACVs. The craft will demonstrate new technology with unique subsystems, and during tests and trials will also demonstrate the military effectiveness of the concept of employing air cushion vehicles in amphibious assault. The best features of the JEFF (A) and JEFF(B) will then be combined to design and build a production configuration.

    The follow-on design and procurement of fleet hardware will be accomplished under the Landing Craft, Air Cushion (LCAC) Acquisition Program.

    Another craft, the JEFF (A), which is being constructed by the Aerojet Liquid Rocket Company, will be delivered to the Navy this month. The two craft use very different technical approaches to meet the same set of performance requirements. Each will carry more than 60 tons of payload.

    Developed under the Navy's Amphibious Assault Landing Craft (AALC) Program, the JEFF Craft have been designed to operate from the well decks of amphibious ships. Riding on a cushion of air a few inches above the surface of water or land, the craft will be able to transition from the sea through the surf and across the beach to offload cargo—men, vehicles and equipment—on hard ground. With these c r a f t , the Navy will develop the technology and demonstrate the feasibility and military utility of employing ACVs in an amphibious assault.

    P r e s e n t i n g the key to the JEFF(B) for Bell Aerospace Textron at the July 28 ceremony was John Kelly, vice president, New Orleans, Operations, and Robert Postle, Bell's program manager throughout the design and construction of the craft.

    Accepting the key to the JEFF(B) for the Navy was Jeffrey Benson, the Naval Sea Systems Command AALC program manager in Washington, D.C.

    Mr. Benson's remarks included congratulations to the Navy and to Bell personnel for their outstanding individual and team efforts, and a special note of appreciation to the families of all involved for t h e i r support in achieving this important milestone.

    The key to the craft and custody for its operations and maintenance were t r a n s f e r r e d to Comdr. Wallace G. Wilder, USN, the officer-in-charge of the AALC Experimental Trials Unit, a field activity, and representative of the Commanding Officer, David W. Taylor Naval Ship Research and Development Center, located at Carderock, Md.

    Also on the podium for the delivery ceremony were Melvin M.

    Brown, AALC Program technical manager at DTNSRDC, Carderock; Casey Forrest, the current Bell AALC Program manager; Comdr. William A. Rehder, USN, Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Conversion and Repair, New Orleans, La.; Frank Higgins, manager of Test Operations of the AALC Experimental Trials Unit, and Lt.

    J.N. Mullican, USN, Officer-in- Charge of the JEFF(B).

    Lieutenant Mullican, USN, BMI C.L. Groover, and Adm. R.M.

    Green, members of the ETU, accepted the key, started the craft, brought it up on cushion, turned and proceeded down the ramp onto beautiful St. Andrew Bay for the first mission under complete Navy control.

  • Bell Aerospace Textron, Division of Textron, Inc., has been awarded a $27.3-million contract for detail design and construction of the first Minesweeper Hunter (MSH) for the U.S. Navy. The contract also provides the Navy with two additional options to acquire eight more MSHs at a cost of $126.

  • Bell Aerospace Textron, Division of Textron Inc., has just been awarded a $102-million contract to construct additional air cushion landing craft for the U.S. Navy. The contract was announced by John J. Kelly, senior vice president and general manager of Bell Aerospace Textron, New Orleans Operations

  • A former chairman appeared before the Los Angeles Metropolitan Section of The Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers and presented a paper on " A i r Cushion Drilling Systems." Harold D. Ramsden, manager b u s i n e s s d e v e l o p m e n t , Global Marine Development, Inc., was the

  • The U.S. Navy recently awarded a $l-million contract to Bell Aerospace Textron of New Orleans, a division of Textron Inc., for the final phase of the contract design of a minesweeper hunter (MSH) that rides on a cushion of air. The award of this new MSH contract was announced by John J. Kelly, senior

  • Textron Marine Systems (TMS), Division of Textron Inc., has been awarded major U.S. Navy contracts for the Landing Craft, Air Cushion (LCAC) Program totaling more than $225 million. One contract valued at $216 million calls for the construction of 12 LCAC and major equipment items. This contract

  • Philadelphia Gear of King of Prussia, Pa. 19406, has been chosen to design, manufacture and test the propulsor reduction gearbox for the 3,000-ton Surface Effect Ship (3KSES). The planned cost for this effort through design, development, test and delivery of one ship set of four propulsor r e d u c

  • John J. Kelly, president of Textron Marine & Land Systems, a division of Textron Inc., has been named the recipient of the Robert M. Thompson Award for Outstanding Civilian Leadership, presented annually by the Navy League of the United States. He was honored at the Navy League Convention. The

  • John J. Kelly, president of Textron Marine Systems (TMS), Division of Textron Inc., recently announced the delivery of Landing Craft, Air Cushion (LCAC)-24 to the U.S. Navy. Following remarks by Eugene E. Shoults, program manager for the Amphibious Warfare and Strategic Sealift Program (PMS 377)

  • A $30-million contract for long lead time materials for the next six landing craft, air cushion (LCAC) vessels has been awarded to Bell Aerospace Textron, Division of Textron, Inc., New Orleans. This new contract, announced by John J. Kelly, senior vice president and general manager of Bell Aerospace

  • It was announced by John T. Gilbride Jr., vice president and general manager, that Todd Seattle has been awarded a Phase I DATA REVIEW AND PRODUCTION PLANNING contract for the air cushion landing craft (LCAC) follow-on construction program. The LCAC is a high speed air cushion landing craft that

  • to provide bunkering services in the near future. The operation is insured by Lloyd's of London, and includes a personnel boat for crew changes, utility boat, 10-foot by 20-foot sea cushion fenders, hoses, communications gear, oil dispersant, and related transfer tackle. Mooring masters are provided

  • MR Jan-20#62 MARKETPLACE)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 62

    MARKETPLACE www.MaritimeEquipment.com Products & Services BOLLARD™ AIR COOLED GENERATORS MAUFACTURED BY MER EQUIPMENT DESIGNED & BUILT FOR THE HARSH MARINE ENVIRONMENT 206.286.1817 LOCATE A DEALER: WWW.MEREQUIPMENT.COM WWWMESAMARINECOM

  • MR Jan-20#56 2020 Calendar of Events
PVA Maritrends  Asia Paci?  c)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 56

    2020 Calendar of Events PVA Maritrends Asia Paci? c Maritime Feb. 3-6 Mar. 18-20 UDT Tampa, FL Singapore May 12-14 www.passengervessel.com/SitePages/ www.apmaritime.com/ Rotterdam maritrends.html www.udt-global.com/join-us-in-2020 OTC Asia Breakbulk Asia EuroMaritime Mar. 24-27 May 18-19 Feb.

  • MR Jan-20#43 Aussie Atlas Shipyard Ready Pressure Cleaners 
Australian)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 43

    Aussie Atlas Shipyard Ready Pressure Cleaners Australian Pump Industries new Aussie Atlas pressure cleaner is the latest addition to its stainless steel line-up of machines designed for shipyard application. The ? rst order will ? nd the units on permanent hire at Garden Island Dockyard in Sydney Harbor

  • MR Jan-20#42 Ship Repair
Activities and Investments in ship repair &)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 42

    Ship Repair Activities and Investments in ship repair & conversion yards Bayonne Drydock & Repair Corp. BDDRC Invests in Shiplift Capacity Bayonne Drydock & Repair in Bay- “We have taken onne, NJ, reported brisk business in 2019, with the BDDRC ? oating drydock delivery of a 1280T and graving dock in

  • MR Jan-20#30 REPAIR & CONVERSION
You have to stand on an exposed)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 30

    REPAIR & CONVERSION You have to stand on an exposed seawall protecting a tiny bility together with the ability to keep a high service speed Norwegian village’s little marina to realize how “the basics” in bad weather,” Hammerfest Hospital said of the order. The must be in place before you can mimic the

  • MR Jan-20#19 latory regime.  Speed through the water cannot be accurate-)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 19

    latory regime. Speed through the water cannot be accurate- ly checked, but is closely related to emissions. Speed over the ground can be checked, but is less closely related to emissions than speed through the water. Average speed can be measured, but is even less closely related to emissions.

  • MR Jan-20#18 The Path to Zero
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Slow)
    January 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 18

    The Path to Zero Copyright: Norman Chan/AdobeStock Slow Down Emission Reduction & Slow Steaming: The voluntary v. regulatory approach erchant ships traditionally operate in the the board, including greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; emis- open sea at or near full speed. This is hard sion of air pollutants

  • MN Jan-20#59 PRODUCTS
STAIRMASTER NITEGLOW 
TCL Series Lube 
Wooster)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 59

    PRODUCTS STAIRMASTER NITEGLOW TCL Series Lube Wooster Products introduced Free Air Hoists The new TCL Series lube STAIRMASTER NITEGLOW an- free air hoists from Har- ti-slip safety renovation treads with rington Hoists operate photoluminescence, for exit path without air supply lubrica- markings

  • MN Jan-20#58 PRODUCTS
MegaPress CuNi      
Viega‘s MegaPress CuNi)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 58

    PRODUCTS MegaPress CuNi Viega‘s MegaPress CuNi, a copper nickel press ? tting system, designed to replace welding for applications on commercial ships, private yachts and offshore rigs, is now available in sizes of 2½” to 4”. Using a single seal- Thursters Condition Monitoring ing element and

  • MN Jan-20#56 PEOPLE & COMPANY NEWS
Kennedy  Falkner  Green Fenimore &)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 56

    PEOPLE & COMPANY NEWS Kennedy Falkner Green Fenimore & Mayes ogy software development, force mea- Graham, Chapman Crowley Awards surement systems and Starrett Special Join NTSB Board Scholarships Gage Department. The National Transportation Safety Crowley Maritime Corp. presented Board is set to

  • MN Jan-20#49 VESSELS
Armstrong to Build Hat Island Ferry
rior vessel)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 49

    VESSELS Armstrong to Build Hat Island Ferry rior vessel control from the raised pilothouse or second station forward. Two bow thrusters and aluminum push knees with rubber fendering ease repeated mooring. Two passenger gates at the bow plus a side door aft expe- dite the boarding process. Additional

  • MN Jan-20#40 WATER USAGE
to a long-term reduction in water consumption.)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 40

    WATER USAGE to a long-term reduction in water consumption. a water audit in a building would apply to a small vessel. For If all goes well and the audit does uncover areas where instance, leaks can be a big problem. This is because the high water consumption can be reduced, this can prove to be a

  • MN Jan-20#39  Gathering two years of water utility bills,    less water)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 39

    is being wasted; and in the as well as drainage systems case of restrooms, if new ? xtures can be installed that use • Gathering two years of water utility bills, less water than those in use or use no water at all. checking them, not necessarily for charges, Water audits are not necessarily new

  • MN Jan-20#32 SAFETY 
nation as to whether the de?  ciency is a “one)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 32

    SAFETY nation as to whether the de? ciency is a “one off” (likely • Manning speci? c to reductions in engineering speci? c to the vessel and its crew), or whether it’s systemic, staff for automation pointing to a failure in company management. Lindholm, from EDT Forensic Engineering, provided As

  • MN Jan-20#21 security and environmental sustainability
• Providing)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 21

    security and environmental sustainability • Providing leadership in formulating regulatory policy • Showcasing the reliability, ef? ciency and attractiveness of ferry transport • Promoting the industry’s economic and social value • Expanding membership to countries currently under-represented These

  • MN Jan-20#13 the best sightseeing and vessel operation on San Francisco)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 13

    the best sightseeing and vessel operation on San Francisco ultimate credit, were very quick to catch on. Today, every- Bay. At the same time, if the consumer wants another type one notices and comments on the cleanliness of the engine of service; then that is their choice. spaces, which still shine like

  • MP Q4-19#45 PORT AUTOMATION
Although autonomous vehicle technology is)
    Nov/Dec 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 45

    PORT AUTOMATION Although autonomous vehicle technology is advancing toward providing a complete solution to all logistics and port operation scenarios, for the foreseeable future, it’s easier and safer to have a human help operate these vehicles remotely using teleoperation technology.” – Amit Rosenweig

  • MP Q4-19#25  
more than $5 trillion.
and utility providers to harden electrical)
    Nov/Dec 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 25

    W h e e l Across the nation, seaports support more than e r 30 million jobs and have an economic impact of more than $5 trillion. and utility providers to harden electrical infrastructure, to build • Going high-tech power redundancy, and to receive priority power restoration. Technology provides

  • MP Q4-19#22 ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW
plan. The EPA focuses on ships’)
    Nov/Dec 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 22

    ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW plan. The EPA focuses on ships’ Engine International Air Pollu- that their crews and managers have suffcient training and record- tion Prevention certifcate, bunker delivery notes, fuel samples, keeping systems to maintain compliance with IMO 2020 rules, and other requirements.

  • MP Q4-19#21 S
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New limits on the sulfur content of maritime)
    Nov/Dec 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 21

    S a v a g e New limits on the sulfur content of maritime fuel will go into effect on January 1, 2020, and they represent some of the most signifcant changes to marine fuel regulations in years. W h i t f i e l d New standards provide new opportunities for federal enforcement actions. According to U.S.

  • MP Q4-19#20 ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW
Anticipating Enforcement of Sulfur)
    Nov/Dec 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 20

    ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW Anticipating Enforcement of Sulfur Emissions Rules under IMO 2020 By Justin Savage, Peter Whitfeld, and Marshall Morales he new limits adopted under the International Convention documenting unavailability. That report must be fled for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL)

  • MP Q4-19#16 INSIGHTS
ciency. Not having enough air on a vessel can)
    Nov/Dec 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 16

    INSIGHTS ciency. Not having enough air on a vessel can have catastrophic to the ship’s power plant, where it’s used to fuel steam boilers and consequences, but in a business where maintaining margins can dual-fuel marine diesel engines. The LNG boil-off also causes a already present major challenges

  • MP Q4-19#15 E
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Driving what appears to be the biggest shake-up)
    Nov/Dec 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 15

    E n d s l Driving what appears to be the biggest shake-up to the E y shipping industry in decades, the rules are changing regarding shipping vessel emissions and fuel — and the deadline for compliance is fast-approaching. Onboard equipment: often makes more sense to gener- Often, the switch to LNG power

  • MP Q4-19#11 G
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Neil Graham, technical director of Royston)
    Nov/Dec 2019 - Maritime Logistics Professional page: 11

    G r a h a Neil Graham, technical director of Royston, m considers what marine vessel owners and operators can do to ensure diesel engines are as prepared as possible for IMO Sulphur 2020. Fuel Oils al specifcation for their plungers As 2020 rapidly approaches, very low and ultra-low sulphur and often