California

  • The Domino Theory was the Cold War concept that if communism obtained a foothold in a region – say Vietnam in Southeast Asia – other countries would soon fall like a perfectly aligned row of dominoes to communism (e.g., Cambodia and Laos). Whether one supports the theory or not, it has at least one strong point: it was a simple story to tell. 

     
    It feels like California has adopted its own version of the Domino Theory: if California pushes the regulatory envelope for zero emissions, other states and countries will certainly adopt similar strategies. The narrative’s importance is that it counters the argument that California is building a regulatory state that will leave it hamstrung with costs and uncompetitive in a global marketplace. 
     
    This zero-emission Domino Theory is on full display in California’s maritime industry where port authorities and regulators are working to reduce emissions from port-related activities. California port authorities have led the way in establishing themselves as global green port leaders. It is a well-earned reputation. During the past decade, ports have reduced diesel particulate matter, a pollutant of particular concern to local communities, between 76 percent to 88 percent, depending on the port complex. That reduction is no mean feat. It translates to meaningful improvements in air quality and reductions in health risk. 
     
    But part of the argument for being a green leader is that other ports will follow California’s example. The dominoes must fall at each port around the country and, when it happens, California will not stand alone. We will have started the movement. Yet, to date, no has followed California’s green leadership; the dominoes remain upright. 
     
    No port outside of California requires or incentivizes the use of shore power for cargo vessels. No port has developed a meaningful Clean Trucks Program to accelerate the turnover of drayage trucks. Those ports that do have green port programs on paper are letting time, rather than command-and-control regulation, do the heavy lifting. With time, older, more polluting equipment is replaced with modern equipment that has the latest emissions control systems. This is the same strategy that has successfully reduced emissions from passenger vehicles across the country. In addition to achieving the same emission reductions, the time approach also eliminates stranded asset costs and the need to incentivize equipment replacement saving billions.
     
    As California ports look to further burnish their environmental credentials, they face a difficult challenge. Because all available feasible, cost-effective technology has been deployed, two paths exist to further emission reductions. One is incremental through the use of near-zero technologies. In this case, incremental means achieving an additional 90 percent reduction on top of a previous 90 percent reduction in emissions standards for on-road and off-road equipment. For the mathematically challenged, that would be the equivalent of a 99 percent emissions reduction. The only hurdle to this pathway is that equipment is just now becoming commercially available and a new (California-only, of course) engine standard requiring equipment manufacturers to sell cleaner equipment is not expected until the 2023 timeframe and may only apply to on-road engines.
     
    The other pathway is a paradigm shift with a move straight to zero-emissions. This pathway’s main hurdle is that the equipment available today is fully automated and costs about $35 billion to address just cargo-handling equipment statewide. This equipment makes-up only 4 percent of port-related diesel emissions and less than 1 percent of regional diesel emissions. Or, we can place our bets on electrified versions of the existing diesel-powered equipment marine terminals currently use. It should be noted that this equipment does not currently exist and nor does any of the supporting infrastructure necessary to power it. To further complicate matters, tackling zero emission “solutions” for other port-related equipment (locomotives, drayage trucks, harbor craft and tugs) is even more challenging and more expensive. 
     
    How California ports accomplish this transition to zero-emissions while remaining both competitive and an industry leader remains unanswered.
     
    Not to be out done, California’s regulators are taking a cue from the ports and pressing for even more aggressive action. In a proposal heard by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) at the end of March, California will lay out their new vision for tackling emissions. This updated vision calls for beginning the transition to zero-emission cargo-handling equipment early, in 2026, despite the fact that no equipment capable of successfully operating in a marine terminal environment exists. 
     
    Even more disturbing, it upends the traditional approach to improving air quality. Normally, the State would require equipment manufacturers to build and sell equipment that meets an emissions performance standard. California would sometimes match that demand with a requirement that forces users to retire the oldest equipment to accelerate the introduction of the newest, cleanest equipment. This time, no proposal for tighter (or even zero) emission standards exists and there is no requirement for equipment manufacturers to sell zero emission equipment. Instead, it appears that California will give the equipment users a hearty “good luck” and the sole burden to find such equipment.
     
    California regulators have targeted the maritime industry to lead the way on zero emissions because it can. State regulators are poised to set aggressive maritime sector targets that are decades ahead of the requirements proposed for other California industrial sectors. In doing so, it shifts the costs of technology development from all California industrial sectors to the maritime sector. The maritime sector will have to bear the burden of technology development that the rest of the State will be able to rely on to meet their requirements decades later.
     
    All of this “leadership” is happening in the context of a decade-long slide in California ports’ market share – a trend that isn’t likely to end soon. Both California ports and regulators assure stakeholders that they will proceed judiciously and do not wish to harm the source of tens of thousands of jobs statewide. To that end, both port authorities and the State have repeatedly called for other jurisdictions to follow their lead to help maintain an even playing field. No one has followed. 
     
    Despite efforts by California ports and regulators to form partnerships outside of California, no dominoes have fallen elsewhere. The question to be asked, after more than a decade of California “leading” the way, is anyone willing to follow? Or, will California and its ports continue to stand alone?
     
     
    The Author
    Thomas A. Jelenić is Vice President for Pacific Merchant Shipping Association (PMSA). Mr. Jelenić works with policy makers, regulators, industry leaders and other entities to help ensure that sound science and industry issues are part of the discussion as California continues to call for the increased use of zero and near-zero emissions equipment at California’s ports and throughout the goods movement industry. Jelenić has two decades of maritime industry experience, including more than 14 years in environmental and planning positions at the Port of Long Beach, the nation’s second busiest seaport, and senior management roles in private consulting and logistics development.
     
     
    (As published in the April 2018 edition of Marine News)
  • The newly formed California Launch Service Corporation christened its first launch vessel on June 14, in ceremonies at the St. Francis Yacht Club, San Francisco, Calif. Rees B. Williams Jr., president of the firm, headquartered in San Francisco, said the company received authorization to operate as

  • The University of California at San Diego has purchased the 125- foot supply/geophysical survey vessel Midnight Alaskan from Midnight Boat Company of Berwick, La., for operation by the worldfamous Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, Calif. The research craft will be renamed the Robert

  • .com CEO/President: Philip Cruver No. Of Employees: 6 Catalina Sea Ranch, LLC, headquartered at Terminal Island in the Port of Los Angeles, California, has secured the first permit for offshore aquaculture in U.S. Federal waters from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which was unanimously approved

  • The Trinity Marine Group has been awarded a contract to build a 183-foot diner boat for Hornblower Dining Yachts of California. The new flagship of the Hornblower fleet, largest of its type on the West Coast, will operate out of the Los Angeles Harbor beginning in the spring of 1989. While new in

  • oil to cleaner burning distillates on oceangoing craft is anything but a routine event for some vessels. But, don’t take our word for it – the State of California does a pretty good job of recordkeeping, and the numbers don’t lie.  It’s probably a good thing, then, that the U.S. Coast Guard in September published

  • Merchant Shipping Association (PMSA) revealed the maritime industry's economic impact on three West Coast states. Maritime and related industries in California generate $14.4 billion annually, $4 billion in northern California and $10.4 billion in southern California, the study found. International trade

  • sales, it was announced by J.P. Gray, president. Mr. Couch, a vice president since February 1978, will continue as Matson's area manager for southern California. Mr. Prince will continue as area manager for northern California, the position he has held since July 1980, and Mr. Kelai will continue as Hawaii

  • West Coast. That said; any marine operator – located anywhere on the globe – can glean valuable ‘take-aways’ from this video. The states of Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon and Washington, and the province of British Columbia collaborated on the project with support from the Pacific States/British Columbia

  • California Dreamin': In CA, offshore wind has unlimited potentialWhen it comes to States promoting renewable, non-fossil electricity generation, California surely leads the list, from utility-scale regional grids to individual rooftop solar panels.In fact, a December 2018 update from the California Energy

  • between oil slicks applied with dispersants and those not, application of dispersants from boats, and the use of dispersants in southern California. One session will highlight the interagency dispersant decision process. In-depth case histories of oil spill cleanup efforts will detail a pipeline

  • , was the introduction of Phillip Eisenberg, national president of MTS and past president of SNAME. Mr. Eisenberg is well acquainted in southern California. He had been in town on other business and heard of the scheduled meeting. He delayed his departure long enough to put in an appearance and

  • MN Aug-20#25  rst re-
sponders in southern California which WMI has rebrand-
ed)
    August 2020 - Marine News page: 25

    markets. Domestically, WMI has acquired the rights to builder the Crystaliner vessels, a model widely used by ? rst re- sponders in southern California which WMI has rebrand- ed as the Surf Pro and Fire Pro. After this ? rst step into the hardsided boat market, WMI is expanding its portfolio to

  • MN Aug-20#14  
Armstrong Marine 
used from California to Alaska. But the Paci)
    August 2020 - Marine News page: 14

    . All American Marine got its start more than 30 years ago specializing in the construction of aluminum ? shing vessels Armstrong Marine used from California to Alaska. But the Paci? c Northwest boatbuilder adapted to changing markets in the ’90s, and USA today it is a builder of custom-tailored aluminum

  • MR Jul-20#57  Trans- versity of Southern California’s Aviation Safety Program)
    July 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 57

    instructor in MBA from Daniel Webster College, a graduate of the Uni- Long Island. Holding a Masters in International Trans- versity of Southern California’s Aviation Safety Program. portation Management, and an Unlimited Chief Offcers For the last 10 years he has been the aviation analyst License

  • MR Jul-20#26 .  University of California at Berkeley Labor Center)
    July 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 26

    it will ture in Denmark, captured in a report by Robert Collier for the take $314.4 million to upgrade the Port of Albany-Rensselaer. University of California at Berkeley Labor Center. Is there a That excludes, however, some important work, from utilities MARAD discretionary grant program to pay for folding

  • MN Jun-20#53  RIBs will again 
(RIB), the California Department of Fish )
    June 2020 - Marine News page: 53

    , in excess of 40 miles per hour. new Ribcraft 5.85 rigid in?atable boats according to the builder. The newly ordered RIBs will again (RIB), the California Department of Fish The boats feature a forward positioned utilize the 19’ Ribcraft 5.85 design, and Wildlife awarded the Massacusetts- center

  • MN Jun-20#20  owner Bill Wing, the California company and its polyure-)
    June 2020 - Marine News page: 20

    In past decades, under the leadership of founder and now-for- says. “Current ownership saw this and believed that addition- mer owner Bill Wing, the California company and its polyure- al capital to get ahead of the curve would yield success. Our thane rafts and air-holding tubes, and later air/foam hybrid

  • MT May-20#60  2, 1931 
in Berkeley, California, Walsh has been 
involved)
    May 2020 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 60

    recognize the critical role played by technology in opening up whole new frontiers of exploration in the sea.” Born on November 2, 1931 in Berkeley, California, Walsh has been involved in oceanography, explora- tion, and marine policy for more than ffty years. Upon graduation from the United States Naval

  • MR May-20#55  virtual pushbuttons and 
The California Energy Commission awarded)
    May 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 55

    of a Touchscreen and Bal- last Control Panel. The touch screen provides the Aker Solutions operator an interface using virtual pushbuttons and The California Energy Commission awarded Aker Solutions gauge displays for real-time control and indication and Cognite a $2 million grant for a project called

  • MR May-20#48 . He identified 
Zealand and California and will provide  tailored)
    May 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 48

    areas of a ship. quired for ships visiting Australia, New fouling. The formulations are typically Bay, Florida in the 1940s. He identified Zealand and California and will provide tailored to specific operational profiles the barnacle Balanus amphitrite and the excellent guidance in making decisions and

  • MN May-20#50  regulations. throughout California.
power tug is powered)
    May 2020 - Marine News page: 50

    , courtesy Robert Allan Ltd. Diversi?ed Marine in Portland, Ore., for Brusco. The 82-foot, 6,000-horse- fornia’s environmental regulations. throughout California. power tug is powered by twin Caterpil- “This high performing tug exempli?es A high-performance Markey winch lar 3516E (2240kw@1,800rpm) U.S.

  • MN Apr-20#44  in 2017.
director of California’s Port of Long Beach)
    April 2020 - Marine News page: 44

    Port Au- van Heyningen rate Supply Chain Management and thorities elected Mario Cordero, executive Risk and Insurance functions in 2017. director of California’s Port of Long Beach, to serve as the association’s next Chairman Damen Names Van Heyningen COO As of April 1, Marc van Heyningen will of the

  • MN Apr-20#39  that will operate in the California Bay Area. Prior 
to)
    April 2020 - Marine News page: 39

    to complete the aluminum construction and out?t- ting of a 70-foot zero-emissions, hydrogen-powered, electric drive ferry that will operate in the California Bay Area. Prior to transfer to AAM, the project had begun at Bay Ship & Yacht shipyard in Alameda, Calif. (still operational amid CO- VID-19) where

  • MR Mar-20#61 , resulting in an esti- California and the EU have become)
    March 2020 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 61

    results indicated a speed loss authorities in Australia, New Zealand, on vessel ef? ciency than previously of just 0.5 percent, resulting in an esti- California and the EU have become in- thought. “We estimate that the average mated fuel savings of $1.5 million and creasingly sensitive to biofouling risk

  • MT Mar-20#20  executive sum- (MBARI) in California and the Sieben 
is eDNA)
    March 2020 - Marine Technology Reporter page: 20

    (MURU) Marine Science and terey Bay Aquarium Research Institute science/sensing community. The word Policy Initiative. The executive sum- (MBARI) in California and the Sieben is eDNA, an abbreviation for environ- mary of this gathering made it clear: Lab at Dalhousie University in Nova mental DNA. This

  • MN Mar-20#39  a new, and complex, 
California’s tougher air quality)
    March 2020 - Marine News page: 39

    upgraded to a Tier 3 / electric mix in order to meet Ferstrum added that this approach retains a fa- miliar technology, avoiding a new, and complex, California’s tougher air quality goals. SCR learning curve. Alcalá placed hybridization at the top of the list regard- “We can retro? t keel coolers in a vessel

  • MN Mar-20#29  at the University of California 
San Diego.
Other technology)
    March 2020 - Marine News page: 29

    to the DoD’s Defense Innovation Unit in Silicon Valley, and the establishment of the Blue Technology Center of Ex- pertise at the University of California San Diego. Other technology improvement ef- forts highlighted included the Coast Guard’s Cyber Strategy, improving cutter connectivity and modernizing

  • MN Jan-20#27  LOLA in federal court 
in California, “to limit their exposure)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 27

    bodies were still being recovered by the Coast Guard,” the owners ? led a Petition for Ex- oneration and/or Limitation under LOLA in federal court in California, “to limit their exposure to the value of the vessel after the casualty, which is $0.00.” With the Branson tragedy Sterbcow said that excursion

  • MN Jan-20#24  Trans- Salud Carbajal, from California’s 24th District, the)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 24

    Implementation Credit: U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lora Ratliff By Tom Ewing n November the U.S. House of Representatives’ Trans- Salud Carbajal, from California’s 24th District, the location portation & Infrastructure Committee, Coast Guard of the recent Conception dive boat disaster, submitted bills and

  • MN Jan-20#18  to en- Duck 7 and in California aboard the dive boat)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 18

    . 2019 last January, I announced two In light of the casualties in Missouri involving Stretch strategic goals for our industry: to en- Duck 7 and in California aboard the dive boat Concep- hance safety and foster the professional tion, PVA is encouraging its members to intensify efforts growth of our next

  • MN Jan-20#13  operations for the  the California Air Resources Board)
    January 2020 - Marine News page: 13

    working with another company and port from All American Marine and great support from BAE. This vessel involves very different operations for the the California Air Resources Board (CARB) to build a captains, and additional training was necessary as we rolled high-speed hydrogen fuel cell ferry to operate

  • MN Dec-19#51   in Chemistry from California Poly-
technic State)
    December 2019 - Marine News page: 51

    . She also served in Planning divisions. She earned her BS sharing of knowledge – an inspira- public affairs and communications in Chemistry from California Poly- technic State University and her Mas- tion to the best of the best. for the American Waterways Opera- 51 www.marinelink.com MN

  • MN Dec-19#39   Santa Cruz Island in California. The vessel burned to)
    December 2019 - Marine News page: 39

    Aquatic on board, caught ? re while anchored in Platts Harbor, off Nuisance Prevention and Control Act and the National Santa Cruz Island in California. The vessel burned to the Invasive Species Act as well as other U.S. Coast Guard waterline by morning and subsequently sank in about 60 and clean

  • MR Dec-19#44  Willow Pass Road Concord, California, 94520
Description:)
    December 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 44

    $ $64,315 , Full Time , Mid Career Email: arubin@hroptions.com Category: Information Technology Military Sealift Command Willow Pass Road Concord, California, 94520 Description: Salary: $ $39,301 , Full Time , Mid Career Any Entry Level Announcement #: 20-210-01EXOC Title, Series, Grade Category: Shipboard

  • MR Nov-19#70  collabo- has moved to sunny California where he  ing risk management)
    November 2019 - Maritime Reporter and Engineering News page: 70

    shipping market. joining Chevron 30 years ago, Herron a reputation can happen overnight, mak- Drawing on the company’s collabo- has moved to sunny California where he ing risk management the primary role of Raising the BMA ration with the Bahamas Maritime Au- is General Manager of Fleet Operations. Chevron